Wade Moody’s Duramax Powered Dragster

Thirty-two-year-old Wade Moody has been racing for more than half of his life and is no stranger to the exhilarating feeling of piloting a fast vehicle down the 1/4-mile. After racing motocross as a teen the Mechanicsville, MD engine builder moved to diesel drag racing in 2006 with a 4WD Cummins powered Dodge Ram successfully competing in the Pro Street class winning a few championships. Then he purchased an S-10 drag truck to move up the ladder and race in the Pro Stock class. After building a potent Duramax engine for the S-10 and refining the setup he drove the truck to championships in 2011, 2012 and 2013. But 2014 was a rough year for the NGM Diesel team when he got into the wall and ended the truck’s reign as the fastest diesel drag truck.

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EARLY SUCCESS

Fortunately, the engine and transmission survived the wreck enabling Moody to move into the quickest and fastest Duramax powered drag racer we know of. Moody and his team at NGM Diesel swapped the Duramax engine and Turbo 400 transmission from the Pro Stock truck over to the dragster you see here. After about three months of build time the Spitzer dragster had the healthy Duramax engine fit between the rails and was making test passes on the track at the end of the 2015 racing season. And while the team has experienced many growing pains getting the rail down the track they have already become the quickest and fastest Duramax-powered drag racer making their best 1/4-mile pass in 7.02 seconds at 195.48 MPH. Since they only made 10-15 passes with the rail and none of them were under full power for the full 1,320 feet the team expects great things as they continue to dial-in and refine the dragster and expect to be running in the 6s at over 200 MPH in 2016 with the goal of eventually becoming the quickest and fastest diesel dragster on the planet.

Looking down upon the engine you can see the custom machined long runner Wagler Competition Products intake manifold perched atop the NGM Diesel spec’d Wagler Duramax cylinder heads.

Looking down upon the engine you can see the custom machined long runner Wagler Competition Products intake manifold perched atop the NGM Diesel spec’d Wagler Duramax cylinder heads.

The 400 cid parallel twin turbocharged Duramax is the heart of the beast making an estimate 2,100 HP. The equal length tube headers are a work of metal crafting art and a unique sight to see on a diesel engine.

The 400 cid parallel twin turbocharged Duramax is the heart of the beast making an estimate 2,100 HP. The equal length tube headers are a work of metal crafting art and a unique sight to see on a diesel engine.

A pair of Industrial Injection XP CP3 pumps are used to deliver all the fuel the Duramax needs. Notice the cogged drive belt that ensures that there is no slip on the pulleys under heavy load and high RPM.

A pair of Industrial Injection XP CP3 pumps are used to deliver all the fuel the Duramax needs. Notice the cogged drive belt that ensures that there is no slip on the pulleys under heavy load and high RPM.

DMAX TRANSPLANT

Moody and his team started with the Duramax engine from the Pro Stock truck as the basis for the dragster. But it is far from a stock Duramax diesel engine, the 400 cid engine features a billet aluminum engine block with a custom bore and stroke combination the team settled on to maximize the drag racing potential of the diesel V8. An NGM Diesel crank swings a set of R&R aluminum rods and Diamond pistons through the cylinder bores that are capped off with a set of Wagler Competition Products cylinder heads that were built specifically to NGM’s specifications. To hold everything together Moody and his team rely on custom A1 studs to keep the crank in the block and heads on top of it. To actuate the valves, they designed a custom camshaft that works with the custom valve train they developed to maximize airflow in and out of the engine. Lubrication is handled by a dry sump system with a Weaver Brothers pump, Curtis Halvorsen fabricated pan and Stef’s oil tank. The system is plumbed with Aeroquip hoses and fittings and holds about three gallons of Pure Power oil to keep the engine well lubricated as it flies down the track.

BOOST AND SPRAY

Spent gasses are expelled through a set of custom fabricated equal-length headers made with stainless steel tubing from Flo~Pro. Each header terminates at an Industrial Injection modified Borg Warner EFR turbo charger running in a parallel twin-turbo configuration complete with a pair of Turbosmart waste gates to keep boost levels in check. Exhaust outlet pipes from both turbos as well as the pair of waste gates send the spent gasses into the air at an angle upward and away from the chassis above the rear tires. Mesh screens are fastened to the turbo inlets to prevent bugs and track debris from being sucked into the chargers but other than that they run unrestricted. The compressed charges are channeled directly to the custom long-runner Wagler intake manifold that was machined to NGM Diesel design specifications. Dual NX nitrous bottles are mounted behind the engine to provide some extra oomph as the dragster blasts down the track.

The firewall behind the driver seat holds the Stef’s oil tank for the dry sump system as well as the PPE Dual CP3 controller, OBD port and a factory GM ECM.

The firewall behind the driver seat holds the Stef’s oil tank for the dry sump system as well as the PPE Dual CP3 controller, OBD port and a factory GM ECM.

A Borg Warner EFR-series turbo charger that was modified by Industrial Injection is perched at the end header along with a Turbosmart waste gate.

A Borg Warner EFR-series turbo charger that was modified by Industrial Injection is perched at the end header along with a Turbosmart wastegate.

Two large NX bottles of nitrous oxide are on hand to help make more power.

Two large NX bottles of nitrous oxide are on hand to help make more power.

FUELING THE BEAST

The fuel system starts with a pair of Industrial Injection XP CP3 pumps mounted to the front of the engine that are driven with a custom cogged belt from the crankshaft. A PPE dual CP3 control module is used to regulate the demand between the two pumps. The pair of pumps delivers a huge amount of fuel to the Industrial Injection Dragon Fire injectors to squirt plenty of fuel into each cylinder on demand. Moody and his team opted to stick with a tried and true GM ECM to control the potent Duramax engine. EFILive tunes from Johnboy Jordan are used to get the most out of the engine. Since they are still using a factory ECM the engine is limited to 5,800 RPM but they are still getting plenty of power out of it. Moody estimates that the combination makes around 2,100 horsepower with about 2,100 lbs-ft of torque; a nice square figure to blast the lightweight rail down the track at a near 1:1 horsepower to weight ratio.

Looking at the rear of the dragster you see a lot of tire and a little rear axle, this setup is built for straight line speed.

Looking at the rear of the dragster you see a lot of tire and a little rear axle, this setup is built for straight line speed.

Massive 35.0/15.0-16 Mickey Thompson ET Drag slicks are securely held in place on the double beadlock Mickey Thompson Pro 5 wheels. You can also see the ends of the Strange Engineering axle shafts that deliver the power to the wheels.

Massive 35.0/15.0-16 Mickey Thompson ET Drag slicks are securely held in place on the double beadlock Mickey Thompson Pro 5 wheels. You can also see the ends of the Strange Engineering axle shafts that deliver the power to the wheels.

Peaking under the chassis between the headers and the rear tires you can see the Rossler Turbo 400 transmission along with the CSR scatter shield and ProTorque torque converter.

Peaking under the chassis between the headers and the rear tires you can see the Rossler Turbo 400 transmission along with the CSR scatter shield and ProTorque torque converter.

TRANSMISSION

The potent Duramax engine is linked to a Rossler Transmissions Turbo 400 3-speed automatic GM transmission through a Suncoast billet SFI-rated flexplate and ProTorque torque converter. While a Rossler trans is a tough unit, David Gates and the NGM Diesel crew applied some modifications to it to make sure it would live behind the big Duramax. To protect the driver and vehicle from a catastrophic transmission failure the top side of the case is covered with a CSR SFI scatter shield. Output from the transmission is directly coupled to a set of custom built rear gears and a Strange Engineering spool contained inside the Spitzer fabricated rear end housing that is solidly mounted to the chassis. Short Strange Engineering axles send the power to the wheels while a pair of four-piston Wilwood brake calipers clamp down on drilled rotors to help whoa down the beast at the top end of the track. Primary slowing at the top end of the track is handled by a pair of Deist parachutes that Moody releases electronically from a push button on the steering wheel or with a manual hand control from the cockpit if necessary when he crosses the stripe.

“…they have already become the quickest and fastest Duramax-powered drag racer making their best 1/4-mile pass in 7.02 seconds at 195.48 MPH.”

THE COCKPIT

Much like the cockpit of a fighter jet, the cockpit of Moody’s dragster is all about getting the job of racing done with minimal distractions. He straps into a molded carbon fiber seat with a 5-point harness with a quick release latch to help him exit faster in the event of an emergency. The two handle steering wheel is mounted on a quick-release steering shaft and features four buttons to handle deploying the parachutes, applying trans brake, staging bump and transmission shifting that are easy for him to reach while driving the car down the track. A manual backup parachute release lever is located on the left side of the cockpit to be deployed in the event of an electrical failure. A Racepak digital display is nestled in the dash in front of the steering wheel to allow Moody to see vital engine details easily. Transmission gear selection is handled by a pneumatically actuated Precision Performance Products shifter mounted on the right side of the cockpit.

Moody’s office may be small and cramped but he doesn’t spend a lot of time in the seat and tends to work in 4-7 second bursts anyhow.

Moody’s office may be small and cramped but he doesn’t spend a lot of time in the seat and tends to work in 4-7 second bursts anyhow.

The buttons on the steering wheel allow Moody to set the transbrake, bump into the staging lights and shift the transmission without taking his hands off the wheel. He hits the big red button to deploy the parachutes at the end of a run.

The buttons on the steering wheel allow Moody to set the transbrake, bump into the staging lights and shift the transmission without taking his hands off the wheel. He hits the big red button to deploy the parachutes at the end of a run.

CHASSIS WORK

Turning your attention to the chassis, Moody and his team started with a 272-inch wheelbase 2005 Spitzer dragster chassis and built it from the ground up. Tipping the scales at around 2,050 pounds the slip-joint chromoly tube-chassis is covered in lightweight carbon fiber Spitzer bodywork with a small wing up front and larger one in the rear to help keep the chassis solidly in contact with the track as it blasts down the dragstrip. Skinny 22/2.50-17 Mickey Thompson ET Front tires are wrapped around a set of spindle-mount 5-spoke polished Mickey Thompson drag wheels up front. To put the power to the track the rear employs a set of Mickey Thompson ET Drag 35.0/15.0-16 slicks wrapped around Mickey Thompson Pro 5 double beadlock wheels that prevent the wheel from spinning inside the tire when Moody mashes the loud pedal. The chassis has a single wheel wheelie-bar to help keep the front end from flying too high when the lights turn green and Moody hits the throttle.

After Moody and the rest of the NGM Diesel team got the car running and hit the track late in 2015 they were able to make around a dozen total passes shaking down the car and trying to get it dialed in. Their best 1/4-mile pass tripped the lights in 7.02 seconds at 195.48 MPH in just their third pass with Moody pulling the parachutes early as the car was having some stability issues on the top end. We were able to watch the team make a few passes in person at the Rudy’s Truck Jam fall event where it recorded a best 1/8-mile pass of 4.49 seconds at 163.51 MPH. As the team continues to refine the setup and get it dialed in we’re sure they will continue to get faster and we expect to see them dip into the 6s and break 200 sometime in 2016, so keep an eye out and you might get a chance to see the fastest Duramax powered drag racer on the planet at a track near you. DW

 Fastest Duramax