Mario Williams’ Towering, 700HP Mega Cab

In the world of professional athleticism, it always pays to be bigger, stronger, and downright better than the competition. For Mario Williams, Defensive End for the Miami Dolphins, his line of work requires the latter is always the case on any given Sunday—but we have a feeling his on-field frame of mind carries over to the types of vehicles he drives. While Mario is fairly well known for his exotic sports car collection, most don’t know that he has an affinity for lifted, powerful trucks, hence the towering 700hp behemoth you see here.

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“700hp Behemoth”

Back in February, and after getting the urge to inject a little more “go” into his Cummins-powered ’13 Ram, it was dropped off at Fleece Performance Engineering for a full-on power makeover. While under Fleece’s care, the truck’s horsepower doubled and its factory shortcomings were addressed. Now, the massive Mega Cab sports more than just an aggressive look. Its bark matches its bite.

Prepping The Top End

Starting with the 6.7L Cummins, and because a compound turbo arrangement and higher rpm would soon be in store, Fleece scrapped the factory valve springs in favor of Hamilton Cams’ 103-pound units. The stock push tubes were also pulled and replaced with a set of Hamilton’s Stage 1, two-piece units. To rule out any head gasket issues, ARP Custom Age 625+ head studs keep the head anchored to the block.

Excessive heat and pressurized coolant issues are eliminated thanks to one of Fleece’s Cummins coolant bypass kits. This kit incorporates a secondary thermostat into the cooling system to ensure temps remain consistent across all six cylinders (instead of the rearmost cylinders heating up and pressurizing the coolant). Also notice the Steed Speed exhaust manifold bolted to the head.

To rule out valve float, creep, or bent pushrods at elevated rpm and boost, the 6.7L Cummins under the hood of Mario William’s ’13 Ram was fitted with Hamilton Cams’ 103-pound valve springs and Stage 1 push tubes. ARP Custom Age 625+ head studs keep the head glued to the block.

A massive, 8-ply, vertically-mounted air filter and Fleece’s A/C line reroute kit makes fitment of its Cummins compound kit as clean as possible. A fabricated coolant tank replaced the factory reservoir (up by the passenger side firewall) as well, which holds an additional ½ gallon of coolant over stock.

Once through the intercooler, boosted air makes its way to a Mega-Flo intake elbow from Glacier Diesel Power. From there, boost enters a billet, high-flow intake plenum from Fleece Performance prior to making its way into the head.

Keeping the PowerFlo 750 CP3 and 200hp injectors happy is an AirDog II fuel system. Capable of flowing 165-gph and sufficient for trucks making up to 800 hp, it’s right at home in this application (711 hp at the wheels).

Fuel for The Fire

Stepping up the common-rail side of fuel delivery entailed the use of Fleece Performance 200hp injector nozzles and one of the company’s PowerFlo 750 CP3’s. Thanks to EFI Live tuning, the large injectors can be dialed back enough to where the PowerFlo 750 (a 10mm stroker pump) can keep up. Should Mario ever want to push the horsepower envelope considerably further, an injector upgrade won’t be necessary. A 165-gph AirDog II lift pump system keeps a steady supply of diesel on tap for the CP3 to use.

Two’s Company

For optimum streetability and great all-around performance, a Fleece Performance Cummins compound kit graces the engine bay. The complete, turnkey turbo system included an S362 FMW BorgWarner charger serving as the high-pressure (manifold) unit, with one of the company’s BorgWarner based S475’s acting as the low-pressure (atmosphere) turbo. A Steed Speed manifold improves exhaust flow, while a Glacier Diesel Power Mega-Flo intake elbow combines with a Fleece billet intake plenum to aid airflow into the head.

The front suspension sports a 10-inch Full Throttle Suspension lift, complete with Full Throttle Suspension’s own 2.0 remote reservoir shocks. In keeping with the truck’s murdered out theme, all suspension components were powder coated black.

Mario’s Ram gets its broad-shouldered stance thanks to 24×14 American Force SF8 wheels. The aggressive look is further enhanced by way of a set of meaty, 38×13.50R24 Nitto Trail Grappler M/T’s.

Fleece Performance’s Cummins compound kit positions an internally wastegated 62mm S300 SX-E turbo from BorgWarner above a Fleece-built S475. The quick-lighting 62/75 arrangement makes for a very responsive truck on the street, but also provides great top-end pull. All intercooler piping was powder coated Black Cherry, providing a subtle yet unique departure from the truck’s gloss black-on-black scheme.

M3GA-Sized 68RFE

Extreme torque, bigger wheels and tires, and the sheer weight of a lifted truck is a recipe for wreaking havoc on the 68RFE transmission. So in order for the six-speed auto to live, it had to be built up to withstand the 1,400 lb-ft of torque it would see. Turning to the experts at Sun Coast Converters, one of its M3GA competition 68RFE transmissions was chosen, and then bolted in place behind the Cummins. With a billet (M3GA) drum, billet Low/Reverse sprag, calibrated transmission pump, and vastly improved valve body, virtually all of the 68RFE’s weaknesses are corrected. A triple disc torque converter with a billet stator handles torque transfer.

“1,400 lb-ft of torque”

The one addition in the cab is an Edge Insight CTS2 monitor to keep an eye on all of the truck’s vital signs. Boost, EGT, and transmission line pressure are all viewed regularly on-screen.

While nearly every corner of the truck’s exterior has been altered, be it cosmetically or for performance, the Longhorn Edition interior remains untouched.

For axle wrap control, a traction block style traction bar setup is employed out back. Eight inches of rear lift exist as well, courtesy of a Full Traction system combo’d with the adjustability of air ride provided by Kelderman.

In a lot of ways, Mario’s Ram makes perfect sense. It’s big, bold, and fast—exactly what you would expect someone that hunts down quarterbacks for a living to drive. For us, it’s nice to know that when he isn’t grinding it out on the gridiron we might just find him behind the wheel of this beast—hunting down a sports car or two. DW

Specs

Year/Make/Model: 2013 Ram Mega Cab Laramie (Longhorn Edition)
Owner: Mario Williams
Hometown: Houston, Texas
Engine: 6.7L Cummins with ARP Custom Age 625+ head studs, Hamilton Cams Stage 1 push tubes, Hamilton Cams 103-pound valve springs
Fuel: Fleece Performance PowerFlo 750 CP3 and 200hp injector nozzles, AirDog II 165-gph lift pump system
Turbo/Air: Fleece Performance Cummins compound kit with BorgWarner S362 FMW manifold turbo, Fleece Performance S475 atmosphere turbo, Glacier Diesel Power Mega-Flo intake elbow, Fleece Performance billet intake plenum
Exhaust: 5-inch Jamo Performance Exhaust turbo-back stainless-steel system, Steed Speed manifold
Tuning: Fleece Performance EFI Live with Edge Insight CTS2 monitor
Transmission: Sun Coast M3GA competition 68RFE with billet L/R sprag, calibrated pump and valve body, billet stator triple disc torque converter
Horsepower: 711 hp (dyno)
Torque: 1,440 lb-ft (dyno)
Tires: 38×13.50R24 Nitto Trail Grappler M/T
Wheels: 24×14 American Force SF8
Suspension/Driveline: 10-inch Full Throttle Suspension lift with 2.0 remote reservoir shocks (front), 8-inch Full Throttle Suspension lift with 2.0 remote reservoir shocks (rear), traction block traction bars, Accurate Driveline and Machine (ADM) one-piece rear driveshaft