Educating A Workforce

Diesel Mechanic Training Schools

In a nation so heavily focused on pushing high school graduates into 4-year colleges, crippling student loan debt and mediocre job markets, some of our most basic skilled tradesman jobs continue to get more enticing due to a limited trained workforce. This holds true for the construction business with a shortage of framers, plumbers and electricians and it applies to the diesel industry as well. If you have a younger generation showing interest in diesel mechanics, there really can be a bright future in that career with the proper training and work ethic.

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Currently our job market is strong, and a study done by the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that between 2012 and 2022, there was expected to be a 9% increase in jobs within the diesel mechanics field. Whether it be working for large trucking companies servicing their fleet of vehicles in small automotive repair shops all over the country.  So what is out there for further post high school education and training that pertains specific to the diesel industry?

With a little online research there were 279 schools listed within the United States with Diesel Programs that could offer either a basic certificate in diesel training (one year program) or an Associate’s Degree in Diesel Technology (two year program). Obviously every schools specific curriculum will vary, but in general these community and technical colleges try to cater to adult students. Meaning evening and weekend classes are very common, with an average of 12-15 hours per week of school training.

On average across the nation there has been about a 68% acceptance rate into these programs and with average tuition costs around $3900, it could be a much more affordable option than big 4-year universities. These courses spend a lot time training through hands-on experience and internships with local repair shops and trucking companies are also a great way to get professional training.

While we can’t look in to every state and what campuses and training programs would be available near you. We can take a few examples from a few states doing well within the diesel industry as a whole. Texas for example has 26 different institutions offering Diesel Technology training, with an average of just 20 students per class and an 84% acceptance rate. That is a state that is willing and able to properly train someone for a diesel mechanics career.

Wyoming has 5 community colleges or technical campuses for diesel training, with an average of just $2400 in tuition. It’s also a state with a huge demand and need for mechanics, with recent studies showing an increase of over 30% in the job market between 2010 and 2020. Diesel Mechanic jobs in Wyoming are showing an average beginning income of $35,000 with the best mechanics surpassing $80,000 per year.

North Carolina is also a state with some promise for the field of trained mechanics, with 13 schools within the state they average just 16 students per class, so you can expect great one-on-one training from the teachers and a low $2200 tuition average can keep your student debt low. This is also a state showing promise in demand for mechanic with 35,000 more jobs expected through the 2010-2020 time frame.

Overall, the diesel industry is thriving right now with no real change in the future; there will always be a demand for trained mechanics within the field. The diesel performance industry may be going through some serious changes with all the new emissions regulations affecting some of the possibilities, but with so many diesel powered vehicles on the road and the increasing computer technology within them, the proper training and skills could lead to a great career for those motivated enough to learn.